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Natalie P.

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4 comments so far
  1. Maxine August 17, 2007 7:39 pm

    The people who can deal with the information are people who are taught to think analytically, so we need to shift the emphasis in education away from technology, which gets outdated rapidly, to analytical ability, which gets outdated to the extent of the effort the person* doing the analyzing puts in. There needs be a shift to teaching reading skills beyond an elementary level, and teaching how technology is made not just how to use it, not to mention how to use technology responsibly.

    *Where did they get the facts about a computer having capabilities of a human mind being built within the next ten years? I don’t buy it.

  2. Maddy (miasbo) August 19, 2007 10:13 pm

    Have you ever heard of the book “No Time: Stress and the Crises of Modern Life” by Heather Menzies? (Amazon link: http://www.amazon.com/No-Time-Stress-Crisis-Modern/dp/155365045X )

    It’s touches on a number of issues like information and technological overload in work and home life, how it relates to mental, physical, and emotional health, and the effects it has on society at an institutional level.

    It’s a fascinating book. I think I read somewhere that the author is a professor of Canadian Studies at Carleton University in Ottawa.

    There are some minor points I disagree with in the book, but I really cannot recommend it enough. ‘Tis awesome. =)

    Also, I have to say I agree with the comment before mine about teaching analytical skills above specific technological skills. If technology is going to be developing and changing so rapidly, we need to learn how to adapt quickly and easily to it first, then worry about the specifics.

  3. Noel Figart August 20, 2007 10:20 am

    I’m going to posit that the Darwinian “fittest” will be those precious few who can not only survive in information onslaught, but also have the capacity to filter to get at the critical information and focus on getting the most important tasks completed

    From a Darwinian standpoint, anything that doesn’t kill you before you reproduce, and doesn’t prevent your offspring from reproducing is irrelevant.

    Since our best and our brightest are not the heaviest breeders….

  4. Salope August 27, 2007 12:56 pm

    I had a psychology professor who said, “[…]it wasn’t until I arrived in my doctoral studies that we were taught how to learn. I realized then that the most important thing we can teach our children is how to learn; It’s more important than teaching them facts and figures, I think, because once you know how to learn, learning just happens.”

    He spent a good part of the semester teaching us how to learn and I can testify that this was the singularly most valuable skill I learned in all my years of schooling. Would that I had been taught that skill much earlier. Perhaps we now need to consider formally teaching children how to prioritize and filter. Email does not need to be checked every 5 minutes. Phones that ring do not always need to be answered, in fact I find I’m much more productive when I become extremely selective about when and t=for whom I will pick up the ringing phone (what the heck is voice mail for anyway?)

    And information is not like a mountain; you don’t need to wade through it merely because it is there.